Uncategorized

EV Charging Station Cost Scenarios

Non-networked Single Port EV Charger

*Non-networked stations do not have internet access. This means you can't collect usage data, monitor them for problems, balance loads during peak demand, or charge users a fee for plugging in.

*All costs and incentives are estimated and vary by location and installation needs.

Materials: $1,850
• EV charger approximately $750
• Additional materials including meter pedestal approximately $1,100

Labor: $1,400

Estimated Cost: $3,250

Incentives:
• GCEA and Tri-State rebate: 50% of the cost, up to $1,250 (must be enrolled in TOU rate, cannot be on a net-metered account)

Estimated Incentives: $1,250

Estimated Out of Pocket Cost: $2,000

 

Networked Dual Port EV Charger

*Networked charging stations are connected remotely to a larger network and are part of an infrastructure system of connected chargers.

*All costs and incentives are estimated and vary by location and installation needs.

Materials: $13,000: EV charger approximately $11,500 (includes 5-year data plan and warranty)
• Additional materials including meter pedestal approximately $1,500
Labor: $11,500

Estimated Total Cost: $24,500

Incentives:
• Charge Ahead Colorado grant: $9,000
• GCEA and Tri-State rebate: 50% of the total cost, up to $1,250 (includes charging equipment and electric service installation)

Estimated Incentives: $10,250

Estimated Out of Pocket Cost: $14,250

 

State of Colorado Grant Program

The Colorado Energy Office administers the Charge Ahead Colorado grant to support EV charging equipment.

  • 80% of equipment and labor costs up to $9,000 per networked multiport Level 2 EV charging station
  • 80% of equipment and labor costs up to $35,000 for a direct current fast charger (DCFC)
  • Three funding rounds per year: January, May, and October
  • GCEA can answer questions and provide guidance on grant applications.
Financial Risks with Rooftop Solar

The calculated payback is based on assumptions that net metering laws will not change over the life of the array, that GCEA’s rates will go up by X%, and that GCEA’s rate structure will not change. The forecast for future rates is not provided by GCEA and is sometimes overly pessimistic. Net metering laws are beginning to change across the country and there is a good chance something will change in Colorado during the life of the system which could reduce the cost recovery of the system. It is also probable that GCEA's rate structure will change in the coming years. 75% of GCEA’s costs to provide service are fixed and do not vary based on how much energy a member uses, while our current rate design recovers only 25% of GCEA’s costs through a fixed charge on the member’s bill. GCEA’s future rate structure will, of necessity, change and will likely include a higher monthly fixed charge as well as time differentiated rates to recognize the lower cost, and value, of wholesale power when the sun is shining and the additional cost of power caused by peak demand after sunset.