Charge at Work, Stay and Play

The market for plug-in electric vehicles is growing every month, so owners of multi-unit dwellings, short and long-term rentals, and businesses are adding EV charging to their properties to attract and retain more eco-conscious residents, visitors, and employees.

80-90% of EV charging happens in places with long dwell times, which makes it critical to include EV charging solutions in places where we work, stay, and play. The cost of installation and ownership is more affordable than you might think, especially with all the great funding available.

State of Colorado Grant Program

The Colorado Energy Office administers the Charge Ahead Colorado grant to support EV charging equipment.

  • 80% of equipment and labor costs up to $9,000 per networked multiport Level 2 EV charging station
  • 80% of equipment and labor costs up to $35,000 for a direct current fast charger (DCFC)
  • Three funding rounds per year: January, May, and October
  • GCEA can answer questions and provide guidance on grant applications.
EV Charging Infrastructure Development Checklist:
  • Determine project scope, budget, funding mechanism, and timeline using the following considerations:
  • Determine ideal project site, based on existing infrastructure and infrastructure needs
  • Determine the type and costs of charging equipment needed, typically a Level 2 station
  • Decide whether the stations will need to be networked, including if utilization data will be collected and if payment capabilities are necessary
  • Determine if a formal solicitation is needed
  • Choose a network and/or charging infrastructure manufacturer and provider
  • Identify installation needs and costs and find a certified electrical contractor
  • Apply for grant funding, rebates, and tax credits
  • Obtain required permits
  • Determine additional site needs, including signage and security
  • Assess charging infrastructure maintenance and operation needs and costs
  • Confirm the station is included on EV station finding apps, like www.plugshare.com
EV Charging Station Cost Scenarios

Non-networked Single Port EV Charger

*Non-networked stations do not have internet access. This means you can't collect usage data, monitor them for problems, balance loads during peak demand, or charge users a fee for plugging in.

*All costs and incentives are estimated and vary by location and installation needs.

Materials: $1,700
• EV charger approximately $700
• Additional materials including meter pedestal approximately $1,000

Labor: $1,300

Total Cost: approximately $3,000

Incentives:
• GCEA and Tri-State rebate: up to $750 ($250 for installation and $500 if enrolled in TOU rate)
• Federal tax incentive: 30% up to $30,000 off an EV charger plus installation costs through 12/31/21

Total Incentives: up to $1,425 (depending on federal tax credit amount)

Estimated Out of Pocket Cost: $1,575

 

Networked Dual Port EV Charger

*Networked charging stations are connected remotely to a larger network and are part of an infrastructure system of connected chargers.

*All costs and incentives are estimated and vary by location and installation needs.

Materials: $12,000: EV charger approximately $10,500 (includes 5-year data plan and warranty)
• Additional materials including meter pedestal approximately $1,500
Labor: $5,000

Total Cost: approximately $17,000

Incentives:
• Charge Ahead Colorado grant: $9,000
• GCEA and Tri-State rebate: up to $1,000
• Federal tax incentive: 30% up to $30,000 off an EV charger plus installation costs through 12/31/21

Total Incentives: up to $12,100 (depending on federal tax credit amount)

Estimated Out of Pocket Cost: $4,900

 

For more information on commercial EV station procurement and installation, click here or call Alliy at 970-641-3520.